Social psychology kenrick 5th edition download

 

    Test Bank for Social Psychology Goals in Interaction 6th Download Test Bank for Social Psychology, 5th Edition, drugchoueterdilist.cf complete Textbook chapters and. bank social psychology kenrick 5th edition, as one of the most involved sellers here will Bank (Download Only) for Social Psychology, 5th Edition, Kenrick. Click here if your download doesn"t start automatically Social Psychology: Goals in Interaction (5th Edition) Douglas Kenrick, Steven L. Neuberg, Robert B.

    Author:GRANVILLE COPPER
    Language:English, Spanish, Portuguese
    Country:Jamaica
    Genre:Children & Youth
    Pages:527
    Published (Last):09.05.2016
    ISBN:712-4-55195-292-3
    Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
    Uploaded by: ESMERALDA

    73420 downloads 158736 Views 32.82MB ePub Size Report


    Social Psychology Kenrick 5th Edition Download

    drugchoueterdilist.cf: Social Psychology: Goals in Interaction (5th Edition) ( ): Douglas Kenrick, Steven L. Neuberg, Robert B. Cialdini: Books. Test Bank (Complete Download) for Social Psychology, 5th Social Psychology 5 th Edition Kenrick Neuberg Cialdini Test Bank. ISBN Social Psychology: Goals in Interaction, 5th Edition. Douglas Kenrick, Arizona State University. Steven L. Neuberg, Arizona State University. Robert B. Cialdini.

    Simpson, J. Evolutionary social psychology. Journal Articles: Ackerman, J. The costs of benefits: Help-refusals highlight key trade-offs of social life. Ackerman, J. Psychological Science, 17, Becker, D. The confounded nature of angry men and happy women. Griskevicius, V. Going along versus going alone: When fundamental motives facilitate strategic non conformity. Kenrick, D. Deep rationality: The evolutionary economics of decision-making. Social cognition, 27,

    D he found no correlation between movie and mood. A The researcher can make causal statements. B The research is ecologically valid. C The findings generalize to other situations. D They allow the researcher to generate many hypotheses. A The laboratory settings can be very artificial.

    B The researcher can't make causal statements.

    Publications – Berkeley Social Interaction Laboratory

    C The researcher has very little control over what happens in the study. D The researcher can't manipulate the independent variable.

    She tests all younger subjects in the morning, and all older subjects in the afternoon. She concludes that aging causes a decline in the speed of responses. A random assignment; systematic variation B internal validity; external validity C external validity; confounds D demand characteristics; confounds Answer: B Diff: 3 Page Ref: 25 Topic: How Psychologists Study Social Behavior Skill: Applied 83 If there is a confound in an experiment, then the experiment lacks A internal validity.

    B generalizability. C external validity. D both B and C Answer: A Diff: 3 Page Ref: 25 Topic: How Psychologists Study Social Behavior Skill: Conceptual 84 In an experiment on the effects of room color on mood, the participants in the pink room condition are asked to read a boring computer manual, while the participants in the bright blue room are asked to read a section from a romance novel.

    Their mood is then measured. A generalizability; a systematic characteristic B external validity; the independent variable C generalizability; demand characteristics D internal validity; a confound Answer: D Diff: 2 Page Ref: 25 Topic: How Psychologists Study Social Behavior Skill: Applied 23 85 As discussed in your text, if you can generalize the results of an experiment to other circumstances, the experiment is said to A have external validity.

    B have construct integrity. C be reliable.

    D have internal validity. B experimenter biases. C demand characteristics. D social desirability cues. Answer: C Diff: 2 Page Ref: 25 Topic: How Psychologists Study Social Behavior Skill: Factual 87 A researcher wants to study the effects of frustration on later aggressive behavior by frustrating half the participants and then measuring the amount of hot sauce they give to a confederate.

    She tells the participants this is a study of "Individual Differences in Taste Preference. A to prevent demand characteristics B to sensitize participants to the purpose of the study C to manipulate frustration D to prevent confounds Answer: A Diff: 3 Page Ref: 25 Topic: How Psychologists Study Social Behavior Skill: Applied 88 The main difference between a laboratory experiment and a field experiment is A laboratory experiments are less controlled.

    B field experiments are more artificial. C field experiments are conducted in a natural setting. D laboratory experiments have better external validity. This type of study is best characterized as A a case study. B a field experiment. C a naturalistic observation. D a correlational study. A There is less control over extraneous factors. B They do not allow cause-effect conclusions. C They are in unnatural settings. D There is no ability to manipulate the independent variable.

    Answer: A Diff: 2 Page Ref: 26 Topic: How Psychologists Study Social Behavior Skill: Conceptual 91 A social psychologist who combines a correlational study, a laboratory experiment, and a field experiment to test the same hypothesis so that she can be sure of her conclusions is A using too many different methods. B wasting her time. C taking a "full cycle" approach.

    D confounding her results. B the use of multiple methods to study the same research question.

    Douglas T. Kenrick

    C the process of going back and forth between the laboratory and the natural world. After the experiment is over, the researcher tells the participant that there really were no shocks, and the confederate is unharmed. This discussion after an experiment is A the debriefing. B the informed discussion. D the therapeutic interview.

    B discussing the procedures with the participants. C alleviating any problems the participant had with the study. D all of the above Answer: D Diff: 2 Page Ref: 29 Topic: How Psychologists Study Social Behavior Skill: Factual 95 In most colleges and universities, which group evaluates whether a potential study meets ethical guidelines for the protection of human participants? Templeton is interested in studying how the crowded living conditions in inner city neighborhoods affect blood pressure and heart rate.

    B sociology. C cognitive neuroscience. D biology. Skill: Factual Social psychology is the study of a person's thoughts and behaviors. Skill: Factual According to the evolutionary perspective, social behavior is a result of both heredity and the environment.

    Answer: The social learning perspective focuses on past learning experiences as determinants of a person's social behavior. It assumes that both direct and indirect learning experiences impact social behavior. Give a clear example of each. Answer: Principles: social behavior is goal-oriented; social behavior represents a continual interaction between the person and the situation. Answer: A case study is an intensive examination of an individual or group.

    Two advantages of case studies are that they can be a rich source of hypotheses and they facilitate the study of rare behaviors. Answer: Archival research involves the examination of systematic data originally collected for other purposes such as marriage licenses or arrest records. The primary advantage of archival research is that it provides easy access to large amounts of pre-recorded data.

    Define validity. Answer: Reliability is the consistency of a score yielded by a psychological test. Validity is the extent to which a test measures what it is designed to measure. A negative one? Answer: A positive correlation is a relationship in which as one variable goes either up or down, the other variable goes in the same direction.

    A negative correlation is a relationship in which as one variable goes either up or down, the other variable goes in the opposite direction. Answer: Random assignment is the practice of assigning participants to treatments so each person has an equal chance of being in any condition.

    Random assignment's key advantage is that it minimizes differences between the groups in an experiment. What is a dependent variable? In an experiment, which is considered the "cause" and which the "effect?

    A dependent variable is the variable that is measured by the experimenter. The independent variable is considered the cause, and the dependent variable the effect.

    Answer: A confound is a variable that systematically changes along with the independent variable, potentially leading to a mistaken conclusion about the effect of the independent variable. Random assignment is the best way to help avoid confounds in experiments. Answer: Psychologists use debriefing to alleviate any potential harm to participants in a study.

    In addition, Institutional Review Boards have been established to review all research involving humans to ensure that it is conducted ethically. What are two views of social behavior that all four perspectives have in common?

    Handbook of Social Psychology, 2 Volume Set, 5th Edition

    Answer: The sociocultural perspective is the theoretical approach that searches for the causes of social behavior in influences from larger social groups, such as nationality and social class. The evolutionary perspective is a theoretical viewpoint in social psychology that searches for the causes of social behavior in the physical and psychological predispositions that helped our ancestors survive and reproduce.

    The social learning perspective focuses on past learning experiences as determinants of a person's social behavior, including both direct and indirect learning experiences. The social cognitive perspective locates the causes of social behavior in the mental processes involved in paying attention to, interpreting, and remembering social experiences.

    The two common views are that : a Social behavior is goal oriented; and b Social behavior represents a continual interaction between the person and the situation. Define each and describe how they are similar and how they are different. The two perspectives are similar in that both search for the causes of social behavior in a person's environment.

    They differ slightly in their breadth of focus over time and place. Social learning theorists emphasize the individual's unique experiences in a particular family, school, or peer group. Sociocultural theorists are less concerned with specific individuals or their unique experiences and are more focused on larger groups of individuals, such as Asian Canadians, Hispanic Americans, college students in sororities, or members of the upper class.

    Where does it look for the causes of social behavior? What is natural selection?

    What are adaptations? How are these important to the evolutionary perspective? Answer: The evolutionary perspective is a theoretical viewpoint in social psychology that searches for the causes of social behavior in the physical and psychological predispositions that helped our ancestors survive and reproduce. Natural selection is the process by which characteristics that help animals survive and reproduce are passed on to their offspring.

    An adaptation is a characteristic that is well designed for survival and reproduction in a particular environment. Natural selection may be considered the driving force behind evolution what makes evolution happen , and adaptations are the products of natural selection: they are essentially our evolutionary legacy. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of naturalistic observation and surveys. Answer: Descriptive methods are procedures for measuring or recording behaviors, thoughts, and feelings in their natural state.

    Naturalistic observation involves recording everyday behaviors as they unfold in their natural settings. Disadvantages to naturalistic observation are that the researcher may interfere with ongoing behavior, that some interesting behaviors are hard to observe because they are rare, the possibility of researcher bias, and that they may be time consuming.

    Surveys are techniques in which the researcher asks people to report on their beliefs, feelings, or behaviors. The primary advantage of surveys is that they allow for the study of difficult-to-observe behaviors, thoughts, and feelings.

    Disadvantages of the survey approach are that the participants may not be representative of the appropriate population and that they may be untruthful or biased in their self-reports. Define the descriptive methods of naturalistic observation and survey studies. What advantages do experimental methods have over these descriptive methods? Answer: Experimental methods are procedures for uncovering causal processes by systematically manipulating some aspect of a situation.

    Descriptive methods are procedures for measuring or recording behaviors, thoughts, and feelings in their natural state. The advantages of the experimental method over these descriptive methods are the ability to manipulate variables, carefully control the participants' environment, and to infer causality.

    Describe the advantages and disadvantages to this approach. The advantages of the experimental method are the ability to manipulate variables, carefully control the participants' environment, and to infer causality. Disadvantages of the experimental method include limits to cause-effect conclusions if potential confounds are not controlled for and to the generalizabilty or external validity of the findings. In addition, experiments are unable to study many kinds of naturallyoccurring behavior.

    Diff: 3 Page Ref: Topic: How Psychologists Study Social Behavior Skill: Conceptual Say you are a researcher interested in studying the effects of drinking Gatorade or plain water on college student performance on a four-hour math test. Describe how you would conduct this experiment. What is the independent variable? The dependent variable? How would you decide who drinks Gatorade and who drinks water? Is deception appropriate here and, if so, what deception would you use and why?

    The costs of benefits: Help-refusals highlight key trade-offs of social life. Ackerman, J. Psychological Science, 17, Becker, D.

    The confounded nature of angry men and happy women. Griskevicius, V. Going along versus going alone: When fundamental motives facilitate strategic non conformity. Kenrick, D. Deep rationality: The evolutionary economics of decision-making. Social cognition, 27, The following are several illustrative examples: 1. In some of his early research, conducted with Sara Gutierres, Kenrick demonstrated that exposure to highly attractive people, like those shown in magazines, on television, and in movies, leads people judge average-looking peers as less attractive, and even to lower their commitment to their current partners.

    Men exposed to beautiful women, for example, rate themselves as less committed to their partners; women do likewise after being exposed to highly successful men. Research he conducted with Richard C.

    Keefe overturned a long-standing assumption that women are attracted to older men, and vice versa, because of the norms of American society. This research demonstrated that the pattern of sex differences found in the United States is found all around the world, and is in fact more pronounced in more traditional societies. Further, young men, who are typically highly committed to sex-role norms, are more attracted to women older than themselves.

    The findings were explained in terms of sex differences in life history — women peak in fertility in their late teens and early twenties, and go through menopause later, men are attracted to cues associated with fertility, not to youth, per se. Men contribute resources to their offspring and can father children well past the age of female menopause.

    Women do not seek age, per se, but seek men with status and resources, which is correlated with age. Early theorizing by evolutionary psychologists suggested that men were, compared with women, relatively nondiscriminating in mate choice. But research on mate choice sometimes found small sex differences, sometimes large differences. In research conducted with Edward K. Sadalla, Melanie R. Trost, and Gary Groth, Kenrick demonstrated that sex differences are small for long-term relationships, where both sexes make a high investment, but very large for short-term relationships, where the differences in minimum parental investment can be much greater.

    Research with Norman P. Li demonstrated that sex differences are more pronounced when men and women are given a realistic budget, and not asked simply to list their ideal desires in a mate. Forced to prioritize, women treat status as a necessity, and downplay physical attractiveness; men do the reverse. Research conducted with Jon Maner, Steven Neuberg, Mark Schaller , and Vaughn Becker has focused on the implications of evolutionarily important motivational states on ongoing cognitive processes.

    This research has demonstrated that people in a self-protective frame of mind are sensitized to potential threats from outgroup males, interpreting neutral facial expressions on such men as hiding anger, for example. In a mating frame of mind, on the other hand, men project sexual arousal onto the beautiful women with neutral facial expressions. Research conducted with Vladas Griskevicius, Robert Cialdini, Jill Sundie, Joshua Ackerman, Adam Cohen and other colleagues has examined the effects of evolutionary significant motives for a number of complex social behaviors, including conformity, creative display, conspicuous consumption , aggression, and economic decision-making.